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Topic
War


Quotes

“Their [schemes] strike at the root of all human happiness and virtue … [seeking] the overthrow of religion, government, and human society civil and domestic.” These conspirators, said Dwight, are so committed to their evil ends “that murder, butchery, and war, however extended and dreadful, are declared by them to be completely justifiable, if necessary for these great purposes.” (Yale Professor Timothy Dwight, speaking of the techniques of the Bavarian Illuminati which was revealed in John Robson's book Proofs of a Conspiracy, which outlined the known history of the society through the government-siezed documents and the testimony of those who were prosecuted. 1798.)


“The Book of Mormon narrative is a chronicle of nations long since gone. But in its descriptions of the problems of today's society, it is as current as the morning newspaper and much more definitive, inspired, and inspiring concerning the solutions of those problems.

“I know of no other writing which sets forth with such clarity the tragic consequences to societies that follow courses contrary to the commandments of God. Its pages trace the stories of two distinct civilizations that flourished on the Western Hemisphere. Each began as a small nation, its people walking in the fear of the Lord. But with prosperity came growing evils. The people succumbed to the wiles of ambitious and scheming leaders who oppressed them with burdensome taxes, who lulled them with hollow promises, who countenanced and even encouraged loose and lascivious living. These evil schemers led the people into terrible wars that resulted in the death of millions and the final and total extinction of two great civilizations in two different eras.(Gordon B. Hinckley, also stated verbatim in his 1981 work Be Thou an Example. First Presidency Message, Ensign, August 2005.)


“I didn't have to get permission from some old goat in Congress to kick Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait” (George H. W. Bush, showing his disdain for the Constitution and referring to the UN's ‘authority’ to declare war Texas Republican State Convention, 1992.)


“The Church as a Church does not believe in war and yet since its organization whenever war has come we have done our part….we do thoroughly believe in building up our home defenses to the maximum extent necessary, but we do not believe that aggression should be carried on in the name and under the false cloak of defense. We therefore look with sorrowing eyes at the present use to which a great part of the funds being raised by taxes and by borrowing is being put.” (Heber J. Grant, , also J. Ruben Clark, Jr. and David O. McKay signed as the First Presidency, written during World War II Letter to the U.S. Treasury, September 30, 1941.)


“It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion of the foreign world...” (George Washington, Farewell Address)


“America goes not abroad in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own.... She well knows that by once enlisting under other banners than her own, were they even the banners of foreign independence, she would involve herself beyond the power of extrication in all the wars of interest and intrigue, of individual avarice, envy and ambition, which assume the colors and usurp the standards of freedom.” (John Quincy Adams, 1821.)


“Of all the enemies to public liberty, war is, perhaps, the most to be dreaded, because it comprises and develops the germ of every other. War is the parent of armies; from these proceed debts and taxes; and armies, and debts, and taxes are the known instruments for bringing the many under the domination of the few....No nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare. In war too, the discretionary power of the Executive is extended; its influence in dealing out offices, honours, and emoluments is multiplied; and all the means of seducing the minds, are added to those of subduing the force, of the people.” (James Madison, Political Observations, April 20, 1795.)


“The Constitution expressly and exclusively vests in the Legislature the power of declaring a state of war [and] the power of raising armies.... A delegation of such powers [to the President] would have struck, not only at the fabric of our Constitution, but at the foundation of all well organized and well checked governments. The separation of the power of declaring war from that of conducting it, is wisely contrived to exclude the danger of its being declared for the sake of its being conducted.” (James Madison, Political Observations, April 20, 1795.)


“When the tyrant has disposed of foreign enemies by conquest or treaty, and there is nothing to fear from them, the he is always stirring up some war or other, in order that the people may require a leader.” (Plato, The Republic)


“Safety from external danger is the most powerful director of national conduct. Even the ardent love of liberty will, after a time, give way to its dictates. The violent destruction of life and property incident to war, the continual effort and alarm attendant on a state of continual danger, will compel nations the most attached to liberty to resort for repose and security to institutions which have a tendency to destroy their civil and political rights. To be more safe, they at length become willing to run the risk of being less free.(Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers, No. 8.)


“Allow the president to invade a neighboring nation, whenever he shall deem it necessary to repel an invasion, and you allow him to do so, whenever he may choose to say he deems it necessary for such purpose — and you allow him to make war at pleasure. The provision of the Constitution giving the war-making power to Congress was dictated, as I understand it, by the following reasons.… Kings had always been involving and impoverishing their people in wars, pretending generally, if not always, that the good of the people was the object. This, our Convention understood to be the most oppressive of all Kingly oppressions; and they resolved so to frame the Constitution that no one man should hold the power of bringing the oppression upon us.” (Abraham Lincoln, Letter to law partner William Herndon)


“Should this at any time happen, how easy would it be to fabricate pretenses of approaching danger? Indian hostilities, instigated by Spain or Britain, would always be at hand. Provocations to produce the desired appearances might even be given to some foreign power.…” (Alexander Hamilton, speaking on “a combination between the executive and the legislative in some scheme of usurpation.” The Federalist Papers, No. 25.)


“[In the minutes of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace about 1911] the trustees raised a question. ‘Is there any means known to man more effective than war, assuming you wish to alter the life of an entire people?’ [A]t the end of the year, they came to the conclusion that there was no more effective means to that end known to man. So, then they raised question number two, and the question was, ‘How do we involve the United States in a war?’” (Research Director for the House of Representatives Norman Dodd, Weak Link: The Feminization of the American Military, 1953.)


“It is also held by some Members of Congress that the United States delegate to the [UN's] Executive Council, in ordering out troops, will act independently of the Congress and without its authority, but will be solely under the orders of the President. This view is held by some on the ground that the President is a symbol of sovereignty, and so has the right to call the Army into war in foreign countries without consulting Congress. It is said that this has been done many times in history. If that doctrine is accepted, the President can take us into war at any time, and the declaration of war by Congress will be simply rubber-stamping the act of the President. Such a doctrine would indicate that many people believe that the Constitution can be changed by customary violations of its limitation of executive power. This if adhered to, is dangerous doctrine. …The control of war power, as provided in the Constitution, must remain in the Congress if the United States is going to remain a republic.” (Senator (R-MN) Henrik Shipstead, one of two Senators opposing passage of the UN Charter July 27, 1945.)


“If the incident is permitted to go by without protest, at least from this body, we would have finally terminated for all time the right of Congress to declare war, which is granted to Congress alone by the Constitution of the United States.” (Senator Robert Taft, protesting our UN authorized ‘police action’ in Korea June 28, 1950.)


“The power of declaring war being with the [Congress], the executive should do nothing neccesarily committing them to decide for war.” (Thomas Jefferson, Ford, p. 9:100.)


“There is one and only one legitimate goal of United States foreign policy. It is a narrow goal, a nationalistic goal: the preservation of our national independence. Nothing in the Constitution grants that the president shall have the privilege of offering himself as a world leader. He is our executive; he is on our payroll; he is supposed to put our best interests in front of those of other nations. Nothing in the Constitution nor in logic grants to the president of the United States or to Congress the power to influence the political life of other countries, to ‘uplift’ their cultures, to bolster their economies, to feed their people, or even to defend them against their enemies.” (Ezra Taft Benson, America at the Crossroads, August 30, 1969.)


“I, _____, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter; so help me God.” (military oath)


“[A] possible further difficulty was cited, namely, that arising from the Constitutional provision that only Congress may declare war. This argument was countered with the contention that a treaty would override this barrier, let alone the fact that our participation in such a police action might be recommended by the international security organization need not necessarily be construed as war.(A confidential memorandum prepared for the State Department by the CFR prophetically anticipating our future wars. American Public Opinion and Postwar Security Commitments, p. 10. 1944.)


“We are bound to maintain public liberty, and, by example of our own system, to convince the world that order and law, religion and morality, the rights of conscience, the rights of persons, and the rights of property may all be preserved and secured.” (Daniel Webster)


“The management of foreign relations appears to be the most susceptible of abuse of all the trusts committed to a Government, because they can be concealed or disclosed, or disclosed in such parts and at such times as will best suit particular views; and because the body of the people are less capable of judging, and are more under the influence of prejudices, on that branch of their affairs, than of any other. Perhaps it is a universal truth that the loss of liberty at home is to be charged to provisions against danger, real or pretended, from abroad.(James Madison, Letter to Thomas Jefferson, 1798.)


“War is the most effective preacher of the vanity of all merely finite interests, it puts an end to that selfish egoism of the individual by which he would claim his life and his property as his own or as his family’s” (John Dewey, German Philosophy and Politics, p. 197.)


“The Rockefeller Foundation and the Council on Foreign Relations…intend to prevent, if they can, a repetition of what they call in the vernacular “the debunking journalistic campaign following World War I.” Translated into precise English, this means that the Foundation and the Council do not want journalists or any other persons to examine too closely and criticize too freely the official propaganda and official statements relative to “our basic aims and activities” during World War II. In short, they hope that, among other things, the policies and measures of Franklin D. Roosevelt will escape in the coming years the critical analysis, evaluation and exposition that befell the policies and measures of Woodrow Wilson and the Entente Allies after World War I.” (Charles Beard, former president of the American Historical Association Who's to Write the History of the War?, Saturday Evening Post, p. 172. October 4, 1947.)


“The Constitution will never reach its destiny through force. God's principles are taken by men because they are eternal and true and touch the divine spirit in men. This is the only true way to permanent world peace, the aspiration of men since the beginning. God never planted his Spirit, his truth, in the hearts of men from the point of a bayonet.” (J. Reuben Clark, The Constitution, Conference Report, April 6, 1957.)


“Be it thy course, to busy giddy minds with foreign quarrels...” (Advice given to the young king in William Shakespeare's play Henry IV.)


“As we seek to understand the causes of wars, persecutions, and civil strife, we can see that they are almost always rooted in wickedness.

“The mass-murders of the twentieth century are among the bloodiest crimes ever committed against humanity. We can hardly comprehend the magnitude of the Nazi holocaust murders of over five million Jews in Europe, Stalin’s purges and labor camps that killed five to ten million in the Soviet Union, and the two to three million noncombatants who were killed or who died of hunger in the Biafran War.

“All of these slaughters, and others like them, were rooted in the ancient wickedness Satan taught—that a man could murder to get gain. (See Moses 5:31) The mass-murderers of this century killed to acquire property and to secure power over others.”

[“And Satan said unto Cain: Swear unto me by thy throat, and if thou tell it thou shalt die; and swear thy brethren by their heads, and by the living God, that they tell it not; for if they tell it, they shall surely die; and this that thy father [Adam] may not know it; and this day I will deliver thy brother Abel into thine hands. And Satan sware unto Cain that he would do according to his commands. And all these things were done in secret. And Cain said: Truly I am Mahan, the master of this great secret, that I may murder and get gain. Wherefore Cain was called Master Mahan, and he gloried in his wickedness” (Moses 5:29-31)] (Dallin H. Oaks, Wealthy Wall Street elitists, enabled and empowered these and many other mass murderers. The documentation for this can be found in several books including the works of Antony Sutton. World Peace, Ensign, May 1990.)


“And again, I say unto you that the enemy in the secret chambers seeketh your lives. Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land.” (Scriptural, Doctrine and Covenants, 38:28-29. January 2, 1831.)


“Every latter-day saint who supports the current war doctrine, should ask themselves ‘Did the Nephites ever pre-emptively strike their enemies? And when they did, what was the result?’” (M B, March 11, 2007.)


The power of Congress:
“The Congress shall have Power...To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures on Land and Water...To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval Forces.” (U.S. Constitution, Article I, Section 8)

The Power of the Executive:
“The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States” (U.S. Constitution, Article II, Section 2) (The Constituion which describes the near plenary powers of Congress and the minute powers of the Executive concerning war and military conduct.)


“I am for free commerce with all nations, political connection with none, and little or no diplomatic establishment. And I am not for linking ourselves by new treaties with the quarrels of Europe, entering that field of slaughter to preserve their balance, or joining in the confederacy of Kings to war against the principles of liberty.” (Thomas Jefferson, to Elbridge Gerry ME 10:77, 1799.)


“I have ever deemed it fundamental for the United States never to take active part in the quarrels of Europe. Their political interests are entirely distinct from ours. Their mutual jealousies, their balance of power, their complicated alliances, their forms and principles of government, are all foreign to us. They are nations of eternal war. All their energies are expended in the destruction of the labor, property and lives of their people.” (Thomas Jefferson, to James Monroe ME: 15:436, 1823.)


“I sincerely join... in abjuring all political connection with every foreign power; and though I cordially wish well to the progress of liberty in all nations, and would forever give it the weight of our countenance, yet they are not to be touched without contamination from their other bad principles. Commerce with all nations, alliance with none, should be our motto.” (Thomas Jefferson, to Thomas Lomax ME 10:124. 1799.)


“Peace, commerce and honest friendship with all nations — entangling alliances with none, I deem [one of] the essential principles of our government, and consequently [one of] those which ought to shape its administration.” (Thomas Jefferson, 1st Inaugural Address ME 3:321. 1801.)


“We wish not to meddle with the internal affairs of any country, nor with the general affairs of Europe. Peace with all nations, and the right which that gives us with respect to all nations, are our object.” (Thomas Jefferson, to C. W. F. Dumas ME 9:56. 1793.)


“A just and solid republican government maintained here will be a standing monument and example for the aim and imitation of the people of other countries; and I join... in the hope and belief that they will see from our example that a free government is of all others the most energetic; that the inquiry which has been excited among the mass of mankind by our revolution and its consequences will ameliorate the condition of man over a great portion of the globe.” (Thomas Jefferson, to John Dickinson ME 10:217. 1801.)


“We face the delicate question of the diplomatic fencing to be done so as to be sure Japan is put in the wrong and makes the first bad move — overt move…The question was how we should maneuver them into the position of firing the first shot without allowing too much danger to ourselves.” (Henry Stimson, Infamy: Pearl Harbor and its Aftermath, p. 275-76. October 16, 1941.)


“If tyranny and oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy.” (James Madison)


“The means of defense against foreign danger historically have become the instruments of tyranny at home.” (James Madison)


“Great is the guilt of an unnecessary war.” (John Adams)


“I think both logic and our present situation demonstrate that you can’t give freedom to a people that are not ready and willing to defend it themselves. And if that’s the case, there’s no need to give it to them at all, for they are perfectly capable of giving it to themselves.

If there is sufficient virtue in a body of people to maintain freedom, there is sufficient virtue to establish it in the first place.” (M B, written regarding the Iraq war. October 5, 2007.)


“Nor may we overlook that great doctrine of neutrality set up under Washington himself and Jefferson and Hamilton, which was aimed at and brought about the localizing of international armed conflicts, and the preservation , under prescribed rules, of peacetime intercourse between belligerents and nonbelligerents. War was to curse as few people as possible. This has been jettisoned for the concept that every war should involve all nations, making all suffer the ravages of a global war.

“Until the last quarter of a century, this gospel of the Fathers was the polar star by which we set our international course. In the first hundred thirty years of our constitutional existence, we had three foreign wars, the first merely the final effort of our Revolution, which made good our independence. During the century that followed we had two foreign wars, neither of considerable magnitude. During the next twenty-three years, we had two global wars. While the gospel of the Fathers guided us we has peace. When we forsook it, two great wars engulfed us.” (J. Reuben Clark, Let Us Have Peace, Church News, November 22, 1947.)


“In our course under the new gospel of interference with everything we do not like, we have gone forward and are going forward, as if we possessed all the good of human government, of human economic concept, of human comfort, and of human welfare, all of which we are to impose on the balance of the world,— a concept born of the grossest national egotism.” (J. Reuben Clark, Let Us Have Peace, Church News, November 22, 1947.)


“Yet, to repeat, we have entered into new fields to impose our will and concepts on others. This means we must use force, and force means war, not peace. What has our apostasy from peace cost us?” (J. Reuben Clark, Let Us Have Peace, Church News, November 22, 1947.)


“I believe American manhood is too valuable to be sacrificed on foreign soil for foreign issues and causes.” (J. Reuben Clark, Let Us Have Peace, Church News, November 22, 1947.)


“I believe that permanent peace will never come into the world from the muzzle of a gun. Guns and bayonets will, in the future as in the past, bring truces, long or short, but never peace that endures.” (J. Reuben Clark, Let Us Have Peace, Church News, November 22, 1947.)


“I believe America’s role in the world is not one of force, but is of that same peaceful intent and act that has characterized the history of the country from its birth till the last third of a century.

“I believe that moral force is far more potent than physical force in international relations.

“I believe that America should again turn to the promotion of the peaceful adjustment of international disputes, which will help us regain the measureless moral force we once possessed, to the regeneration and salvation of the world. We now speak with the strong arm of physical force only; we have no moral force left.” (J. Reuben Clark, Let Us Have Peace, Church News, November 22, 1947.)


“I believe in the old faith and the old works, under which we had so much of peace. I am a political isolationist in the full sense of the term and am not fearful in declaring it.…I believe political isolation will bring to us the greatest happiness and prosperity, the greatest temporal achievement not only, but the highest intellectual and spiritual achievement also, the greatest power for good, the strongest force for peace, the greatest blessing to the world.…We can and should mind our own business and let others do the same.” (J. Reuben Clark, Let Us Have Peace, Church News, November 22, 1947.)


“In my view, our whole international course and policy is basically wrong, and must be changed if peace is to come. Our policy has brought us, and pursued, will continue to bring us, only the hatred of nations now — and we cannot thrive on that, financially or spiritually — and certain war hereafter, with a list of horrors and woes we do not now even surmise.(J. Reuben Clark, Let Us Have Peace, Church News, November 22, 1947.)


“Someone will, at this point, play the ace question, with that smug finality that always accompanies it, — What would you do? I frankly answer, I do not know, for I do not know the facts. Furthermore a critic with no authority or power in a situation, and from whom is withheld a knowledge of facts, is under no obligation to propose an alternative. He may rest by pointing out defects in policy.

“We, the common people, have not been told the facts for years, since long before the last war broke. We are not now being told the facts. We can only surmise. But give us the facts and we will answer. And in our multitude of counsel you will find wisdom.” (J. Reuben Clark, Let Us Have Peace, Church News, November 22, 1947.)


“The great rule of conduct for us, in regard to foreign nations, is in extending our commercial relations to have with them as little political connection as possible. So far as we have already formed engagements, let them be fulfilled with perfect good faith. Here let us stop.” (George Washington, Writings of George Washington, 35:231.)


“We are a warlike people, easily distracted from our assignment of preparing for the coming of the Lord. When enemies rise up, we commit vast resources to the fabrication of gods of stone and steel—ships, planes, missiles, fortifications—and depend on them for protection and deliverance. When threatened, we become antienemy instead of pro-kingdom of God; we train a man in the art of war and call him a patriot, thus, in the manner of Satan’s counterfeit of true patriotism.” (President Spencer W. Kimball, Ensign, June 1976.)


“Therefore, renounce war and proclaim peace...” (Scriptural, Doctrine and Covenants, 98:16. August 6, 1833.)


“Inasmuch as ye are not guilty of the first offense, neither the second, ye shall not suffer yourselves to be slain by the hands of your enemies.…Ye shall defend your families even unto bloodshed.” (Scriptural, Book of Mormon, Alma 43:46-47.)


“Of course the recently, and oft-repeated phrase ‘freedom isn't free’ is true. But we've been paying, for a long time now, with the wrong currency.” (M B, June 13, 2008.)


“And it shall come to pass among the wicked, that every man that will not take his sword against his neighbor must needs flee unto Zion for safety. And there shall be gathered unto it out of every nation under heaven; and it shall be the only people that shall not be at war one with another.” (Scriptural, Doctrine and Covenants, 45:68-69. March 7, 1831.)


“The new preemptive war doctrine we have accepted of ‘do unto others, before they do unto us,’ is a Satanic perversion of the Savior's teaching when he said, ‘Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them.’” (M B, June 13, 2008.)


“Our government has kept us in a perpetual state of fear — kept us in a continuous stampede of patriotic fervor — with the cry of grave national emergency. Always there has been some terrible evil at home or some monstrous foreign power that was going to gobble us up if we did not blindly rally behind it by furnishing the exorbitant funds demanded. Yet, in retrospect, these disasters seem never to have happened, seem never to have been quite real.” (General Douglas MacArthur, American Caesar, 1965.)


“We got around to the subject of war again and I said that, contrary to his attitude, I did not think that the common people are very thankful for leaders who bring them war and destruction.

“‘Why, of course, the people don't want war,’ Goering shrugged. ‘Why would some poor slob on a farm want to risk his life in a war when the best that he can get out of it is to come back to his farm in one piece. Naturally, the common people don't want war; neither in Russia nor in England nor in America, nor for that matter in Germany. That is understood. But, after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy or a fascist dictatorship or a Parliament or a Communist dictatorship.

“‘There is one difference,’ I pointed out. ‘In a democracy the people have some say in the matter through their elected representatives, and in the United States only Congress can declare wars.’

“‘Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country.’” (Reichsmarshall Herman Goering in an interview with Dr. Gustave Gilbert during the Nuremburg War Trials. April 18, 1946.)


“[This planned destruction of agency would be] largely done during the war, under the plea of war necessity; it is to be continued after the war under the excuse — if we are not then too cowed to require an excuse — that this new political order is necessary that we may rehabilitate the world.” (J. Reuben Clark, warning the church prior to American entry into World War II, and prior to the establishment of the United Nations. Conference Report, April 1941.)


“A day of darkness and of gloominess, a day of clouds and of thick darkness, as the morning spread upon the mountains: a great people and a strong; there hath not been ever the like, neither shall be any more after it, even to the years of many generations.

“A fire devoureth before them; and behind them a flame burneth: the land is as the garden of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate wilderness; yea, and nothing shall escape them.

“The appearance of them is as the appearance of horses; and as horsemen, so shall they run.

“Like the noise of chariots on the tops of mountains shall they leap, like the noise of a flame of fire that devoureth the stubble, as a strong people set in battle array.

“Before their face the people shall be much pained: all faces shall gather blackness.

“They shall run like mighty men; they shall climb the wall like men of war; and they shall march every one on his ways, and they shall not break their ranks:

“Neither shall one thrust another; they shall walk every one in his path: and when they fall upon the sword, they shall not be wounded.

“They shall run to and fro in the city; they shall run upon the wall, they shall climb up upon the houses; they shall enter in at the windows like a thief.

“The earth shall quake before them; the heavens shall tremble: the sun and the moon shall be dark, and the stars shall withdraw their shining.” (Scriptural, speaking of a great nation which would spread desolation and misery upon the people of the earth in the latter days. Joel, 2:2-10.)


“It is not improbable that theses ancient prophets were seeing such things as men wearing or protected by strong armor; as troops of cavalry and companies of tanks and flame throwers; as airplanes and airborne missiles which explode, fire shells and drop bombs; and even other weapons yet to be devised in an age when warfare is the desire and love of wicked men.” (Elder Bruce R. McConkie, Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, 3:502-203.)


“[Edward Bernays and Wilson's Creel Commission] succeeded, within six months, in turning a pacifist population into a hysterical, war-mongering population which wanted to destroy everything German, tear the Germans limb from limb, go to war and save the world.” (Noam Chomsky, 1991.)


“Because those whom we have studied thus far in this chapter specialized in restricting information, that lack of information became the frame of reference for the majority. Sadly, those accepting the skewed information unwittingly became tools of a satanic force. By blindly following the Pied Piper of German revulsion, millions lost their lives both at home and abroad and our nation began its plummet into bankruptcy.” (Dr. Jack Monnett, p. 215. 2006.)


“In [General Alexander Haig's] presence, Kissinger referred pointedly to military men as ‘dumb, stupid animals to be used’ as pawns for foreign policy.” (Henry Kissinger, in a book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein (Simon & Schuster, 1976) The Final Days, p. 194.)


“In defense of the World Order... U.S. soldiers would have to kill and die.… We are not going to achieve a New World Order without paying for it in blood, as well as in words and money.” (Aurthur Schlesinger Jr. Foreign Affairs, 1995.)




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